The Honey Wine Company

The Goods

The Deets

Many farming communities worldwide use basic agriculture practices that sometimes don't produce enough food or income to live on. Traditional, hollow beehives hanged in trees are one of these practices – they produce only a few pounds of poor quality honey per year – while frame beehives invented in 1852 and top bar hives produce up to ten times more honey. The people in the Kafa forest region of Ethiopia live on a few dollars a day due to outdated farming practices such as these traditional hives, which they hang in trees for wild bees to inhabit – watch how they do it. Meanwhile, their low incomes are forcing them to cut down the important Kafa rainforest – where coffee originated – for planting crops and to make charcoal from the wood. These practices reduced native tree cover in Ethiopia from 40% to 3% in the last 50 years! Ironically, less tree flowers means less honey. Proceeds from wine sales will finance modern beehive conversions in Kafa and earn Kafa families five times more household income while saving their forest and reducing carbon emissions – read more on sustainability, forests and the plight of bees in our award-winning playful and informative book. With partners, Ayele is working on a much larger project to conserve 250,000 hectares in Kafa, share forest carbon revenues with communities and convert thousands of beehives to modern ones, read about it here. In the future, rare honeys sourced from Kafa forest communities will make ultra premium varietals of Bee d'Vine.

Many farming communities worldwide use basic agriculture practices that sometimes don't produce enough food or income to live on. Traditional, hollow beehives hanged in trees are one of these practices – they produce only a few pounds of poor quality honey per year – while frame beehives invented in 1852 and top bar hives produce up to ten times more honey. The people in the Kafa forest region of Ethiopia live on a few dollars a day due to outdated farming practices such as these traditional hives, which they hang in trees for wild bees to inhabit – watch how they do it. Meanwhile, their low incomes are forcing them to cut down the important Kafa rainforest – where coffee originated – for planting crops and to make charcoal from the wood. These practices reduced native tree cover in Ethiopia from 40% to 3% in the last 50 years! Ironically, less tree flowers means less honey. Proceeds from wine sales will finance modern beehive conversions in Kafa and earn Kafa families five times more household income while saving their forest and reducing carbon emissions – read more on sustainability, forests and the plight of bees in our award-winning playful and informative book. With partners, Ayele is working on a much larger project to conserve 250,000 hectares in Kafa, share forest carbon revenues with communities and convert thousands of beehives to modern ones, read about it here. In the future, rare honeys sourced from Kafa forest communities will make ultra premium varietals of Bee d'Vine.

The Connect

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ayele@beedvine.com

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